skip to Main Content

Stomach Bloat in Dogs and Cats

Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery in Phoenix

Bloat in dogs and cats is a serious condition that must be treated with urgency.

Bloat is also known as gastric dilatation (GD) or gastric dilatation and volvulus (GDV), this occurs when an animal’s stomach fills with fluid, gas, or food, causing it to expand or twist. When the stomach puts pressure on other organs in the body, it can cause other dangerous complications if it is not properly treated by an experienced veterinary surgeon.

If this is an emergency, please notify your primary care veterinarian immediately or reach out to us if you have any questions.

Abdominal Surgery for Dogs and Cats

Abdominal procedures are the most common reason dogs and cats undergo surgery because there are many vital organs in the abdominal cavity. Therefore, there are many different conditions and illnesses that are cause for a veterinary surgeon to step in. Abdominal surgery in dogs range from elective, such as ovariectomy/ovariohysterectomy (spay), to emergency situations, such as gastrointestinal foreign body obstruction, gastric dilatation volvulus (twisted or bloated stomach) and internal bleeding.

READ MORE +

At CARE Surgery Center, the highest standard of care for your pet is our goal. Many abdominal surgeries can be performed via a laparoscopic approach (also known as keyhole surgery). This minimally invasive approach is always chosen with safety and efficacy in mind. This minimizes the impact of surgery on your dog or cat. We have an experienced veterinary team, the latest technology, and the clinical expertise to serve all abdominal surgical needs of your pet.

SHOW LESS

Benefits of Minimally Invasive Surgery Techniques

As many indications for abdominal surgery can be life threatening, abdominal surgery can often save a pet’s life. Our experienced team will ensure your beloved pet receives the highest standard of care as quickly as possible. As mentioned, many elective abdominal procedures can be performed laparoscopically.

Benefits include:

Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
A reportedly safer surgery

Improved visualization for the surgeon with high definition magnification and high intensity illumination

Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Less pain
Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Less medications needed
Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Shorter hospitalization
Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Faster recovery
Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Less scarring

Conditions that May Require Abdominal Surgery for Dogs

Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Gastrointestinal foreign bodies
Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Gastric dilatation volvulus (GDV)

also known as bloat or twisted stomach

Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Tumors in the abdominal organs

(liver, spleen, intestinal, bladder, adrenal gland, kidney)

Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Pyometra

(infected uterus)

Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Dystocia

(difficulty giving birth)

Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Gall bladder conditions
Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Bladder and urethral stones
Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Skin and body wall tumors
Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Wounds
Minimally Invasive Pet Surgery In Phoenix - CARE Surgery Center
Hernias
board certified veterinary surgeon - CARE Surgery Center

Can dogs get hernias?

Painful tears in the abdominal walls, also known as hernias, can happen to dogs just as they do in humans. A hernia is a tear in the wall of a muscle, commonly in the abdomen between the rib cage and groin, that allows internal organs or fatty tissue to push through.

READ MORE +

Dogs can be born with hernias but they can also be caused by physical trauma. Common signs your dog has as a hernia include swollen stomach, excessive drooling, vomiting, shortness of breath, loss of appetite, leg numbness, and anxious behavior.

SHOW LESS

Board-Certified Veterinary Surgeon

Dr. Bleakley specializes in minimally invasive surgery techniques, combining advanced veterinary surgical training with state-of-the-art technology to minimize the impact of surgery for your dog or cat.

CARE Surgery Center

Companion Animal Referral

6677 W. Thunderbird Rd L188
Glendale, AZ 85306

OPEN IN MAPS

Speak for your pet

Back To Top